Friday, 1 August 2014

Dreaming in Fibre Podcast Episode 40 – Killerton Spun and Fibre East 2014





You can find me at www.sarastexturecrafts.com


This is a monthly podcast by Sara's Texture Crafts.

Thank you to new and existing viewers, I hope you enjoy the show!

In this episode I discuss what’s been happening this month and what’s happening next month on the website. Here is a list of points I needed to link to;


FIBRE CLUB #6, YARN CLUB #2 – Open at www.sarastexturecrafts.com August 1st 2014.




CREDITS
 Dreaming in Fibre is filmed and edited by Sara of Sara’s Texture Crafts.

Special Guests – Darrin and Patch.


Products, Events, Information and Shop Updates can be found at

Show notes can be found at
You can also subscribe on YouTube
You can join me on:
Twitter – SARASTEXTURECR
Facebook Page – Sara’s Texture Crafts
Ravelry – SarasTextureCraft
Ravelry group – Sara’s Texture Crafts


Have a wonderful day... Sara x

Subscribe to Updates, so you never miss out on giveaways!

 photo RSS-Icon_zpsa3c3d9bd.png photo Bloglovin-Icon_zpsdef38565.png photo Email-Icon_zps441ddcdd.png

Connect with Me:

 photo Facebook--Icon_zpsfd7bc037.png photo Twitter-Icon_zps19cde513.png photo youtube-Icon_zpsbbfe2728.png photo Ravelry-Icon_zps29204213.png photo Pinterest-Icon_zpsa12c47d9.png photo Instagram-Icon_zps123a784f.png

Thursday, 31 July 2014

SHOP UPDATE: Yarn Club #2 and Fibre Club #6 are OPEN!



I had to open these a day early due to something that has come up for tomorrow... I'm sure you won't mind though ;) There are limited spaces as usual, so please book your spot when you can.

Have a wonderful day... Sara x

Subscribe to Updates, so you never miss out on giveaways!

 photo RSS-Icon_zpsa3c3d9bd.png photo Bloglovin-Icon_zpsdef38565.png photo Email-Icon_zps441ddcdd.png

Connect with Me:

 photo Facebook--Icon_zpsfd7bc037.png photo Twitter-Icon_zps19cde513.png photo youtube-Icon_zpsbbfe2728.png photo Ravelry-Icon_zps29204213.png photo Pinterest-Icon_zpsa12c47d9.png photo Instagram-Icon_zps123a784f.png

Wednesday, 30 July 2014

Customer Question: What are Wool Slubs, Knopps, Knepps and Burrs?

Wool Slubs, Knopps, Knepps and Burrs are waste products of industrial fibre processing and yarn spinning. These are formed when fibres catch in the machinery and roll back onto themselves forming little pod, or ball shapes.

They can also be produced if the animal's fleece becomes entangled on itself whilst still on the animal.

Wool Slubs,Knopps, Knepps and Burrs are great for adding character to yarn by being introduced to the carded or combed sliver before spinning. They can also add texture to felt by sprinkling either between the layers or on top before you begin wet felting. They can even be added your papermaking, by adding in between layers of your base fibres.

I hope this helps?

Have a wonderful day... Sara x


Subscribe to Updates, so you never miss out on giveaways!

 photo RSS-Icon_zpsa3c3d9bd.png photo Bloglovin-Icon_zpsdef38565.png photo Email-Icon_zps441ddcdd.png

Connect with Me:

 photo Facebook--Icon_zpsfd7bc037.png photo Twitter-Icon_zps19cde513.png photo youtube-Icon_zpsbbfe2728.png photo Ravelry-Icon_zps29204213.png photo Pinterest-Icon_zpsa12c47d9.png photo Instagram-Icon_zps123a784f.png

Tuesday, 29 July 2014

Customer Question: I've had my fibre for a while and it's become a bit compact... help?!

Fibre can get a bit compact sometimes, particularly when stored away.


When you first receive fibre, most sellers like me will pack in plastic. This is because we need to preserve the fibre during transit. Make sure you unpack the fibre and store it in a cool, dry place with good ventilation. For example I have a lined wicker basket I keep my fluff in.

Over time fibre stored in plastic will lose its best qualities and often become more compact than you'd like it for spinning.

If you do have compact fibre, or an area of compaction that you want to address before you start spinning, then here's what I recommend;

Firstly predrafting the fibre - Here's a video of how I predraft... pre-drafting-for-spindle-or-wheel-spinning

If you are finding it a bit harder to pull apart in an area where you have a more compact bit, then I suggest using a flick carder, or hand carders, or a drum carder to separate the fibres again. If you don't have the budget for carders then you can, at a push get away with a pet brush. This is not ideal as the teeth aren't set up for wool fibres, but it can help. This is the method I would use for a flick carder/pet brush;

  1. Tear the fibre/tops into manageable pieces.
  2. Take the first one and split it into halves, or 1/4s depending on how compact you are finding the top/fibre.
  3. Wearing an apron, or some cover for your legs (that won't get caught on the teeth of the brush), hold the fibre/top at the mid way point at a slightly downward angle to your leg. Take the brush with your other hand and start to comb the fibres, like a pony tail of hair. Keep carding until the action becomes easier and the fibres become separated. Move up the length of the fibre to comb the rest. If you start finding it difficult to comb further up, simply tear off the piece you have combed and start again on the next part of the length of fibre/top.
  4. You can draft from these smaller combed pieces at your wheel, or if you have hand carders, or a drum carder you can make a batt or rolag to spin with. I have some more videos on this... On youtube.
I hope this helps?

Have a wonderful day... Sara x

Subscribe to Updates, so you never miss out on giveaways!

 photo RSS-Icon_zpsa3c3d9bd.png photo Bloglovin-Icon_zpsdef38565.png photo Email-Icon_zps441ddcdd.png

Connect with Me:

 photo Facebook--Icon_zpsfd7bc037.png photo Twitter-Icon_zps19cde513.png photo youtube-Icon_zpsbbfe2728.png photo Ravelry-Icon_zps29204213.png photo Pinterest-Icon_zpsa12c47d9.png photo Instagram-Icon_zps123a784f.png

Monday, 28 July 2014

Tutorial: Spinning Gradient Yarns... Part 7

Today, in our spinning gradient yarns series I wanted to start a series of sub-posts that look at designing ideas around progressive and true gradients.

I thought it might be nice to start this by looking at the humble hat; a basic stockinette beanie with a rib brim. Why a hat? Well not only are they quick to knit, but you can use very simple ply techniques to utilise your gradient fibres.

Before we go into this, please ignore my child-like colouring in... yes I did have full design training... strapped for time, I rather stupidly didn't perform today, lol!

Ok... So let's have a look at these two beanie hats..
One uses a progressive gradient idea, where you have a very distinct line between colours. This could be accomplished by creating your own faux gradient, or buying a progressive dyed braid of fibre. Navajo ply would be a great way to keep those colours separate, especially on a faux spin. Go back to Part 2 to refresh yourself on how to do this.

Why would I use a progressive gradient for a hat? Tipping, is my answer... 'Tipping' refers to a band of colour usually at the edge of a garment that acts as a trim without having to change stitch detail. On a hat you could design your yarn to knit the ribbing in one colour before you switch to the next colour in the gradient. This would take a bit of working out if you wanted a specific rib height, but you could always play with finishing your rib a bit earlier if the tipping colour changes to the full body colour sooner than you thought.

The other hat uses a true gradient. With this method you would get a good stretch of one colour merging into another. Look at Parts 3 and 5 to refresh yourself on faux and hand dyed versions... I recommend a standard two ply as the easiest method of ply choice.

Why would I use a true gradient for a hat? This is more of a styling choice, in that a gradient basic beanie could be much more interesting to knit than a plain one... it gives a bit of depth to a stockinette knit.

Why don't you have a go and post your versions in the Ravelry thread... it would be great to see what you come up with.

Also just to mention that I have plenty of gradients and colour sets in stock for you to buy at www.sarastexturecrafts.com

Part 8 is all about shawls!

Have a wonderful day... Sara x

Subscribe to Updates, so you never miss out on giveaways!


 photo RSS-Icon_zpsa3c3d9bd.png photo Bloglovin-Icon_zpsdef38565.png photo Email-Icon_zps441ddcdd.png

Connect with Me:

 photo Facebook--Icon_zpsfd7bc037.png photo Twitter-Icon_zps19cde513.png photo youtube-Icon_zpsbbfe2728.png photo Ravelry-Icon_zps29204213.png photo Pinterest-Icon_zpsa12c47d9.png photo Instagram-Icon_zps123a784f.png